Solar energy

SEPA’s goal is to find multiple frameworks that resonate and provide a platform for all stakeholders to participate in our energy future together.”

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Among the things that irk Debbie Dooley the most: How mostly Republican state lawmakers opposed to solar energy benefit – and stay in office – thanks in large part to campaign contributions from investor-owned utilities.

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Dominion Virginia Power and Appalachian Power are public utilities. They hold their monopolies by the grace of the people of Virginia, and are expected to act in the interest of the people they serve. In this case, they have manifestly failed to do so.” — Ivy Main

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Another state in the Southeast U.S. is recognizing the economic and environmental benefits of solar energy as commissioners, utilities and stakeholders in South Carolina are ironing out details of a new solar law that enables third-party leasing and contemplates the state’s two investor owned-utilities utilities, collectively, installing an estimated 300 megawatts (MW) of renewable energy…

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Net metering is voluntary in South Carolina, Idaho and Texas. There is no net metering in Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and South Dakota.

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There is another dynamic in play which does not necesssarily show up as clearly in states where solar makes a lot more sense economically: the desire to be part of a like-minded community and share the learning experience of buying into a much-talked about technology that can scale to help reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Don’t discount the bragging rights from one’s rooftop.

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Pressure from customers and other stakeholders is boosting utility commitments to programs and tools designed to save energy and enable markets for renewable sources of electricity, so says a report by Ceres, a sustainability-focused non-profit and Clean Edge, a research consultancy. But it depends on where you live. In some states – you can probably…

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Virginia has steered clear of clean energy policies that are creating jobs and businesses in dozens of states. Perhaps the biggest reason is that the state’s energy policy – and the only market for electricity – is run by investor-owned Dominion Virginia Power which serves 70% of the state’s electricity load. Curiously, that’s not the case for natural gas, where households and businesses can shop prices and supply contracts offered by several for suppliers.

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Virginia has steered clear of clean energy policies that are creating jobs and businesses in dozens of states. Perhaps the biggest reason is that the state’s energy policy – and the only market for electricity – is run by investor-owned Dominion Virginia Power which serves 70% of the state’s electricity load.

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For clean energy advocates and members of the public who aspire to see markets for solar energy, energy efficiency and cleaner transportation enabled in Virginia, it remains to be see how thorough this effort by the McAuliffe Administration will be.

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