Clean energy

A sea-change is brewing in Florida and it’s shaping up to be the most closely watched 2016 referendum on any state’s election ballot. Solar advocates are on track to ask voters to permit entities other than monopoly utilities to sell power generated by solar energy systems in the Sunshine State. With strong support by the…

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Roanoke, Virginia Tea Party activists are dominating some discussions about sustainability in a region influenced heavily by coal miners and utilities reliant on coal-fired power plants.

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More than 2,500 homeowners have inquired about joining a coop leading to 1,511 on-site rooftop evaluations. At least 283 systems have been installed, or contracts signed, representing 1.42 megawatts worth of new solar power capacity. The local economic impact: more than $4.6 million in sales

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Among the things that irk Debbie Dooley the most: How mostly Republican state lawmakers opposed to solar energy benefit – and stay in office – thanks in large part to campaign contributions from investor-owned utilities.

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Another state in the Southeast U.S. is recognizing the economic and environmental benefits of solar energy as commissioners, utilities and stakeholders in South Carolina are ironing out details of a new solar law that enables third-party leasing and contemplates the state’s two investor owned-utilities utilities, collectively, installing an estimated 300 megawatts (MW) of renewable energy…

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Pressure from customers and other stakeholders is boosting utility commitments to programs and tools designed to save energy and enable markets for renewable sources of electricity, so says a report by Ceres, a sustainability-focused non-profit and Clean Edge, a research consultancy. But it depends on where you live. In some states – you can probably…

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Among the recommendations: ensure that all benefits, and not just the costs, of efficiency programs are accounted for.

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Virginia has steered clear of clean energy policies that are creating jobs and businesses in dozens of states. Perhaps the biggest reason is that the state’s energy policy – and the only market for electricity – is run by investor-owned Dominion Virginia Power which serves 70% of the state’s electricity load. Curiously, that’s not the case for natural gas, where households and businesses can shop prices and supply contracts offered by several for suppliers.

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Virginia has steered clear of clean energy policies that are creating jobs and businesses in dozens of states. Perhaps the biggest reason is that the state’s energy policy – and the only market for electricity – is run by investor-owned Dominion Virginia Power which serves 70% of the state’s electricity load.

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